Chicken McNuggets Is Still Not Pink Goo

//www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/Ua5PaSqKD6k

Back in 2010 the internet freaked out about a picture of pink goo that was claimed to be mechanically separated chicken. I wrote “Fake Picture Of Mechanically Separated Chicken” where I try to explain how it’s not possible.

McDonalds Canada has released a video “Pink goop in Chicken McNuggets? McDonald’s Canada answers (Super Bowl XLVIII)” (apparently it was a Canadian Superbowl ad) that shows how mechanically separated chicken is used to make Chicken McNuggets.

The offical ingredients list of Chicken McNuggets from the McDonald’s website

Ingredients: White Boneless Chicken, Water, Food Starch-Modified, Salt, Seasoning (Autolyzed Yeast Extract, Salt, Wheat Starch, Natural Flavoring [Botanical Source], Safflower Oil, Dextrose, Citric Acid), Sodium Phosphates, Natural Flavor (Botanical Source). Battered and Breaded with: Water, Enriched Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Yellow Corn Flour, Bleached Wheat Flour, Food Starch-Modified, Salt, Leavening (Baking Soda, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Aluminum Phosphate, Monocalcium Phosphate, Calcium Lactate), Spices, Wheat Starch, Dextrose, Corn Starch.

What surprises me is the source of the original pink goo picture still has not been identified.

Advertisements

Less Water In The Southwest

Drought Monitor maps

I should leave this sort of thing to John Fleck, but I found an article at The Christian Science Monitor titled
The new water wars? Study shows broad decline in Rockies snowpack“. When I think of climate change I often think that the Earth will be fine, it’s our way of life that will be impacted.

While the shrinking snowpack in the 20th and early 21st centuries is not unprecedented from a climate-history standpoint, at no time in the past 800 years have so many people relied so heavily on these winter snows for their fresh water. The rivers and the drainage basins that feed them provide as much as 80 percent of the water used for irrigation, power generation, and other purposes by some 70 million people, according to the study.

Meanwhile most of the State of New Mexico continues to be in a drought.