California Investor Delaying The Village at Rio Rancho

According to the article “Springer-Knight: Three reasons the Unser Gateway is raising investor eyebrows” at business insider, a California investor is delaying The Village at Rio Rancho.

Secondly, she said, retail clusters are emerging. Some are hers, like Unser Pavilion and the future Springer Plaza. But she said the long-idle Village at Rio Rancho is back on the radar and the hope is that plans will come back to life. The 65-acre spread is owned outright by a California investor — a situation that Springer-Knight speculated has kept him from feeling more of an urgency to move forward. She said the project has great potential as an outdoor, retail, mixed-use development much like ABQ Uptown. “We’re hopeful to get [the owner] back to the table,” she said.

At the rate they are going it won’t matter because I figure Intel will start winding down operations in 3 years and there won’t be anyone around to go there.

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How Is AMREP Corporation Doing?

seekingalpha.com has a article about AMREP titled “Amrep’s Rio Rancho Dream May Turn Out To Be A Desert Mirage“. Everyone who lives in Rio Rancho should know about AMREP (especially if they live in one of their shitty houses). Overall the article indicates that the company’s media business is on the decline and it’s not well understood how much it’s real estate is worth.

It is currently a company that engages mainly in the business of subscription fulfillment services, newsstand distribution services and product packaging and fulfillment services as well as a bit of staffing businesses. We will call these businesses collectively as Media services and they make up pretty much all of the company’s business activities on a regular basis. The second aspect of the stock’s value is its large ownership of land in the city of Rio Rancho, New Mexico.

In the 1960s, AXR purchased the massive plot of land in Rio Rancho and it was mass marketed to people all over the world as a retirement home or an investment property. The 1960s ads marketed them as wonderful investments at a mere $10/month attracted investors worldwide and particularly from New York. AXR then sold thousands of plots to different investors without considering the future development possibilities of Rio Rancho. Thus, Rio Rancho is now left with the legacy of this antiquated platting method where any meaningful area for development has already been developed and most of the land left has been divided in ownership due to AXR’s own past plot sales.

Be sure to check out their website, which is as shitty as their houses.

More Non News On The Village At Rio Rancho

Village at Rio Rancho

I’m still waiting for The Village at Rio Rancho to open. According to the Albuquerque Journal “Unser corridor attracting more business, development“, the area is growing with business. But its not clear what is going on with The Village.

The Village at Rio Rancho, proposed for 65 acres across the street from Rust, remains preliminary, according to Geisel.

“We are excited that the developer is starting to make plans for the next steps in the project,” he added.

I Was Laid Off From Intel

6989D2D5-A95F-47F6-A343-B194A4AC69F1.jpg

On 11/12/13 I reported to a conference room on the 3rd floor of the RR5 building at the Intel Rio Rancho, New Mexico site. All technicians were to report at their designated time to find out their employment status. My manager stated he had to read from the script and the only part I remember from that script was that “my skills were found to be less than my peers”, or something to that effect. I was notified by my manager that I was “redeployed”, Intel’s term for people that are being laid off. I was told that I would still be employed until 1/15/2014 but that I did not need to come in unless I wanted to.

Intel had announced a few months before that this layoff was going to happen. While I had been mentally preparing myself for it and thinking about what would happen if I did get laid off I wasn’t really expecting to be let go. I had talked to my manger the day before and he didn’t indicate that he was expecting me to be let go. Of course he wouldn’t have any way to know for sure. He wasn’t involved in the decision making process other than to fill out a “skills matrix” of some kind on me. I don’t have any reason to believe that he wrote something like “this guy has no skillz!”. In fact my performance review for the previous year was quite good and my manager was discussing a promotion for me in the next year or two. He was also encouraging me to go to school to finish my degree. Things seemed pretty positive from my point of view.

If I was missing some sort of skills or I was supposed to know something, at least as far as my manger and I was concerned, I think I would have known. This layoff wasn’t supposed to have anything to do with performance anyway. It was supposed to be all skills based. It’s mystery to my exactly what caused me to be on HR’s shit list, but I’m not believing that this layoff was completely skills based.

Intel did a number of things to make this process go easy on the employees. I effectively got a 2 month paid vacation, they waited until the beginning of the year before I was terminated allowing me to get bonuses and other benefits and I get a severance. They could have given no notice and just terminated my employment immediately.

I have moved on and accepted what has happen. It wasn’t easy especially with 18 years at Intel, it hurt. Feelings of rejection and “why me” had a much bigger impact on me than I expected and its hard not to hold a little resentment over how it all went down. But I was better prepared for this layoff financially than the last one in 2006. I am already taking classes to start a career in another industry. Hopefully New Mexico provides jobs in that industry or I may be moving out of state.

What's The Future Of The Intel New Mexico Site

Intel outside by cjc4454 on flickr
Intel outside by cjc4454 on flickr
Intel outside by cjc4454 on flickr

An article in the Albuquerque Journal “Intel’s N.M. future” looks at the Intel Rio Rancho site’s comparison to other state and it’s possibility of building out to support Intel’s latest technology.

Now, with Moore’s law still pushing Intel to double down, or perhaps double up, on the number of transistors it crams onto each chip, New Mexico is vying for the next round of investment in factory upgrades to produce smaller transistors, measured in nanometers.

The plant was last upgraded in 2009 to go from 45-nanometer transistors on chips to 32 nanometers. But that means today Rio Rancho is two cycles behind the curve, since Intel is already producing 22-nanometer chips at other factories, and the company is building manufacturing capacity for 14-nanometer chips at its plants in Arizona and Ireland.

“The next node is 10 nanometer, and no decision has been made yet about where that will be,” said Kirby Jefferson, who became Intel’s Rio Rancho site manager in May. “New Mexico could be 10 nanometers, but next after that is seven nanometers, and maybe New Mexico could be the place for that.”

Another article on the Albuquerque Journal “Intel’s RR plant still viable” that came out at the same time wonders what if Intel’s New Mexico site doesn’t get any new technology.

It’s a question that surfaces in conversations at coffee shops and board rooms in the Albuquerque metropolitan area: Will Intel Corp. invest in upgrades at its plant in Rio Rancho to produce next-generation technology or, as the chips it now produces here become older and less useful, will the Rio Rancho factory wither up and go away?

But the man now running the show in Rio Rancho, site manager Kirby Jefferson, says that kind of talk is premature, because even without upgrades for newer technology, the plant will have plenty of work for years to come.