New Mexico Has No Jobs

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From the Wall Street Journal “New Mexico Looks to Diversify Employer Mix

Bordered by states with rapidly expanding economies, New Mexico remains unable to improve much on an anemic recovery and officials trace it to one root cause: an overreliance on government jobs.

New Mexico posted nonfarm job growth of 0.2% from October 2012 to October 2013, compared with 2.4% in Texas, 1.9% in Colorado, and 1.7% in Arizona, according to a December report by the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions. New Mexico is still down about 40,000 nonfarm jobs compared with late 2007.

The article goes on to give some examples on how the state government is trying to bring in business such as tax cuts. It seems to be too little too late and I’m afraid the worse is to come for New Mexico.

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Former Intel Employee Gets 3 Years Of Prison

From the Associated Press article “Ex-Intel Worker Gets 3 years for stealing Secrets

A former Intel Corp. worker in Massachusetts has been sentenced to three years in federal prison for stealing hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of computer chip manufacturing and design secrets while working for a rival company.

I think he was working at Intel when he was hired by AMD and that’s when he started downloading internal documents. He may have had the idea to sell the documents to AMD but AMD said they didn’t put him up to it and had nothing to do with it.

Intel's D1X In The Oregonian

The Oregonian has an article titled “Intel goes big to get small — an early look at its new Hillsboro research factory, D1X” which looks at the construction and impact of Intel’s new factory in Oregon. Even in Oregon Intel is a big employer.

“If you’re talking even a thousand jobs on one project, that will have a substantial impact on overall construction employment in the Portland area,” said David Cooke, an economist with the Oregon Employment Department. “The construction jobs are very important to the overall economic picture over the short term.”

Those workers will haul away up to a million yards of dirt as Intel excavates for D1X’s foundation and brings the site level with D1D, the fab next door.

Of that, 150,000 cubic yards are headed just up the road, to SolarWorld’s Hillsboro property. That company is contemplating a second factory someday and needs to elevate its property to ensure proper drainage.

The castoffs will raise 4 1/2 acres of SolarWorld’s site by 21 feet.

Intel Is 98 On Forbes "100 Best Companies To Work For" List

Dilbert.com

Intel just barely made Forbes “100 Best Companies To Work For” list at number 98. I generally don’t think top-whatever lists are very useful and I would hate to think someone chooses their employment based on a list like this. Having worked for other large companies I can only say this: Intel is a huge company are there are plenty of good and bad places to work within it. There were quite a few comments made. There would have probably been more if it didn’t require Facebook.

From Hector Martinez:

I worked for Intel for 13 years and was recently laid off. I state those facts so I won’t be accused of toting the company line. While it is true that Intel expects much of their employees they also provide great opportunities to grow, as long as you are wiliing to work for them. Not everyone is going to like the pressure but this is a cutting edge company that leads their industry and not a place for those that cannot embrace the pace and the chaos the pace sometimes causes. Overall I had a great time there and would go back there if they ever chose to hire me back. Each person has a different experience even though they may be in the same place. In all those 13 years I only knew of a handful of techs or engineers that turned in their badge and walked out. I think that speaks to the ability of the company to keep talent regarless of the unrelenting pace of the factories.

From Pablo Luengas:

Vlad and Stephen are free to express themselves because, just like I, they don’t work there anymore. There is no risk of reprecautions. It’s not the same for people who are currently working there, who cannot say much because their identity in facebook will get them in trouble. Laurel’s experience -and a few others- she probabbly didn’t work directly for the fabs (factories as Intel call them), and her experience may be different for that reason. Unfortunately the great majority of people working for intel are related to the fabs and know what I’m talking about. they can corroborate what I say. When you work for intel, there is no life outside the company. if you are a process engineer, they will call you at 3am -you are not obligated to answer- but your review will reflect the “lack of cooperation” if you don’t. You are “owned” by them 24/7. I was there 87-01. Intel, keep your profit share bonus, I’ll take my life back. For my family and my own well being, I think is a great deal!!!!

KRQE At Intel On The Inauguration

KRQE, the local CBS affiliate, was at Intel today during the inauguration. I assume they were doing a follow-up to this story from yesterday about employers showing the inauguration during work hours.

http://www.krqe.com/video/videoplayer.swf

The embedded video here is of that story from yesterday. What about the video from today?

Not only did KRQE have a camera man roving around the cafeteria during the inauguration, they had a reporter in the parking lot around noon time. I assume it was for their noon news report. I can’t find that video on their site. If I did find it I would likely be in it as I passed by the camera several times.

If I do find the video I will update this post with the added video.

Intel's New Mexico Site Layoffs, One Week Later

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I hesitate to blog about work, thinking it will get me in trouble. The most pressing issue in the last month, maybe the last 6 months, has been the layoffs at work, New Mexico’s Intel site in Rio Rancho. Last week everyone got their “message”, either placed in the same position, placed in another position, Not placed with redeployment or just not placed. I was placed with some changes to my current position.

I was prepared both mentally and financially to be laid off. My years of employment at Intel would have provided me with several months of pay. The state is helping everyone find jobs (you know, our Governor is running for President). There was also the chance of going to school. I know, I should be grateful that I have a job particularly since Intel pays so well. Especially for New Mexico. But there were some benefits to being laid off and I am ready for a new career. Or that’s what I have convinced myself leading up to last week. Not to mention that the whole process left a bad taste in my mouth.

There is no good way to do a layoff. There seems to be bad ways to do layoffs. The common way, it seems to me from talking with others who have gone through layoffs at other companies, is that people are suddenly missing one day without warning. You show up to work and a bunch of people are no longer there. Intel’s way was different, it was a process. I could go on and on and on about this, but I will leave it at this for now. Since I still have a job, I want to keep it and stay out of trouble.

The whole reason for these layoffs, which has been widely reported, is that Intel is moving from 200mm to 300mm wafer sizes. There are two factories here, a 200 and 300 one. Merging them together with all the wonders of automation in the 300mm factory means you need less people to run it. New Mexico didn’t have the only 200mm factory, all other factories like this should pay attention to what happened here.

It’s good that I have a job, at least I can focus on other things that don’t involve looking for a job. I paid off my debt in preparation, that was also a good thing. This next year should bring along some changes, time to hold on for the ride.

Related: June 30, 2006: Intel — will it, or won’t it?

Intel Will Upgrade Rio Rancho Plant

Intel Corp. said on Monday it will spend $1 billion to $1.5 billion to retool a factory in New Mexico, which will start to make chips with cutting-edge 45-nanometer-wide transistors in the second half of 2008.

The factory to be renovated in Rio Rancho, New Mexico, is known as Fab 11X and will be the fourth Intel plant to use 45-nanometer technology, which includes new materials that boost chip efficiency by cutting leakage of electrical current.

My employment is secure.

Here’s a little bit more information about the IRB that was used to fund this upgrade. Looks like there’s some money left in the pot.