Horses Being Abandoned Due To The High Costs Of The Drought

From the NYTimes article “Horses Fall Victim to Hard Times and Dry Times on the Range

AZTEC, N.M. — The land is parched, the fields are withering and thousands of the nation’s horses are being left to fend for themselves on the dried range, abandoned by people who can no longer afford to feed them.

They have been dropping dead in the Navajo reservation in the Southwest, where neighbors are battling neighbors and livestock for water, an inherently scant resource on tribal land. They have been found stumbling through state parks in Missouri, in backyards and along country roads in Illinois, and among ranch herds in Texas where they do not belong.

Some are taken to rescue farms or foster homes — lifelines that are also buckling under the pressure of the nation’s worst drought in half a century, which has pushed the price of grain and hay needed to feed the animals beyond the reach of many families already struggling in the tight economy

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Wired Magazine On The Southwest Megafires

Wired.com’s article “Megafires May Change the Southwest Forever

The plants and animals of the southwestern United States are adapted to fire, but not to the sort of super-sized, super-intense fires now raging in Arizona.

The product of drought and human mismanagement, these so-called megafires may change the southwest’s ecology. Mountainside Ponderosa forests could be erased, possibly forever. Fire may become the latest way in which people are profoundly altering modern landscapes.

The two closest fires to me are still burning. The Las Conchas Fire in the Jemez Mountains near Las Alamos is at 92,735 and is close to being the largest fire in New Mexico. The Pacheco Fire near Santa Fe and the Pecos Wilderness has burned a measly 10,000 acres and is 24% contained.

The Donaldson fire is much more south of me but has burned over 43,000 acres.

We are getting signs of Monsoon weather.

Less Water In The Southwest

Drought Monitor maps

I should leave this sort of thing to John Fleck, but I found an article at The Christian Science Monitor titled
The new water wars? Study shows broad decline in Rockies snowpack“. When I think of climate change I often think that the Earth will be fine, it’s our way of life that will be impacted.

While the shrinking snowpack in the 20th and early 21st centuries is not unprecedented from a climate-history standpoint, at no time in the past 800 years have so many people relied so heavily on these winter snows for their fresh water. The rivers and the drainage basins that feed them provide as much as 80 percent of the water used for irrigation, power generation, and other purposes by some 70 million people, according to the study.

Meanwhile most of the State of New Mexico continues to be in a drought.

New Arena Progress

The ice floor is taking shape and soon the chiller will be connected to the building. For hockey fans this is one of the truest signs that the hockey drought is almost over. Season ticket holders can even see the seating bowl and picture their view of the Scorpions beating the competition. Come this October, anyone attending a Scorpions game will have a great view of the ice surface no matter where they sit. No more posts or pillars obstructing the view.

A article on the status os the Santa Anna Star Center

Freak Snow Storm

Although it’s mostly all melted now, we had a full fledged blizzard about 7am this morning. Didn’t last long of course but it’s strange because on Friday I was walking out of work thinking I should have had shorts on. Lots of water coming off the house now as it all melts.

“They” say there will about 30% more moisture than usual this summer. Most people seem to be complaining about the lack of sun, I however am quite content with this one year of rain considering we’ve been in a drought for about 5 years.  

Rio Grande Dries Out

In case there was any doubt that we are still in a drought, “The Rio Grande River has dried out in a 23-mile stretch between Isleta Pueblo and Elephant Butte. Scientists are working on what’s become an annual event.” There is some good news as they are removing restrictions at the Santa Fe National Forest because of the rain and humidity we’ve had. Although the humidity has helped our swamp cooler function very well.