Intel Still Not Opening Fab 42 In Chandler

6768781663_17c6473919_o

According to azcentral.com “Intel says factory to stay shut for now

Intel has confirmed it is leaving vacant a massive new multibillion-dollar computer-chip factory in Chandler that President Barack Obama once touted as a symbol of the future of U.S. manufacturing.

No employees are working in the facility, known as Fab 42, which was completed late last year and was to bring 1,000 jobs and a $5.2 billion company investment.

Don’t worry, the Intel Spokesperson puts a positive spin on the news.

“It doesn’t matter which building they work in; we’ve already increased the workforce by more than 1,000 people at that work site,” Mulloy said.

There’s an interesting note from PC Mag “Intel Scraps Plans to Open Cutting-Edge Arizona Chip Plant

The chip giant received $3.3 million in state tax credits from Arizona for creating about 1,000 new permanent jobs with Fab 42, the Arizona Republic noted in a report breaking the news that the facility has been put on permanent hiatus.
Intel has in fact kept its end of that deal, adding more than 1,000 new workers to its payroll in the state—they just work at other Intel manufacturing facilities in the area, according to Mulloy.
Intel is painting its decision not to open Fab 42 as a simple matter of finding a more efficient means of getting to 14nm production at existing facilities. But it’s hard not to see the impact of a slumping PC market on this development—Gartner recently characterized the double-digit drop in PC shipments in 2013 as the “worst decline in PC market history.”

Advertisements

Chandler Intel chemical leak sends 12 to hospital

Chandler Intel chemical leak sends 12 to hospital

Intel officials said 43 people were evaluated and 12 people were taken to the hospital following a chemical leak at the company’s Chandler microchip plant.

Jason Bagley, a government affairs director for the company, said the leak occurred at about 6 a.m. on Saturday.

“At this point, we don’t have any additional information on these individuals other than they’re being treated and getting the help that they need,” he said.

Los Alamos Lab's Roadrunner Supercomputer To Be Shut Down

The fastest supercomputer in the world in 2009 will be shutdown today, according to the Los Alamos National Labs.

8599713655_c725fb6f3d_bRoadrunner, the first supercomputer to break the once-elusive petaflop barrier—one million billion calculations per second—will be decommissioned on Sunday, March 31.

Roadrunner’s design was unique, and controversial. It combined two different kinds of processors, making it a “hybrid.” It had 6,563 dual-core general-purpose processors (AMD Opterons™), with each core linked to a special graphics processor (PowerXCell 8i) called a “Cell.” The Cell was an enhanced version of a specialized processor originally designed for the Sony Playstation 3®, adapted specifically to support scientific computing.

Future supercomputers will need to improve on Roadrunner’s energy efficiency to make the power bill affordable. Future supercomputers will also need new solutions for handling and storing the vast amounts of data involved in such massive calculations.

Intel May Or May Not Make Not Intel Chips, But May

An article on Reuters titled “Intel might make chips based on non-Intel cores” says.

“There are certain customers that would be interesting to us and certain customers that wouldn’t,” Chief Financial Officer Stacy Smith told journalists after an investor event in London on Thursday.

He said Intel would be happy to produce chip cores based on its own architecture for other companies but that allowing rival architectures to be manufactured in its plants would be a tough decision.

“If Apple or Sony came to us and said ‘I want to do a product that involves your IA (Intel architecture) core and put some of my IP around it’, I wouldn’t blink. That would be fantastic business for us.”

How about Apple or Apple?

Intel Cancels Larrabee

An Intel blog updates on Intel’s graphic’s chip program and says Larabee is no longer. Anandtech has a good analysis of the blog.

Intel cancelled plans for a discrete Larrabee graphics card because it could not produce one that was competitive with existing GPUs from AMD and NVIDIA in current games. Why Intel lacked the foresight to stop from even getting to this point is tough to say. The company may have been too optimistic or genuinely lacked the experience in building discrete GPUs, something it hadn’t done in more than a decade. Maybe it truly was Pat Gelsinger’s baby.

I don’t know why Intel can’t make Larrabee happen but I am disappointed that Intel can’t be competitive with AMD and Nvidia.

What Google Takes Away, Google Gives Back

At the end of last year Google did something with its page rank algorithm that caused my site to loose most traffic from Google. I thought the problem was due to excessive load times on my site. I used Pingdom to narrow the load times to a javascirpt from a WordPress contact form plugin. The javascript took about 4 seconds to load and was loading on every page, including pages that did not have the contact form.

E74DC1D4-7DE3-41AB-BE63-7A491C6D702A.jpg

Once disabled the load times were down to a more reasonable level, although they have crept back up according to Google Webmaster Tools. As far as I can tell it’s images causing the load times. It was a good exercise for me to understand load times but it was a change made completely on Google’s part that caused the loss in traffic. The site not only got the traffic back but it increased a little. Also, when the traffic did come back the site had a significant increase in comment spam, so much that I had to turn off comments for certain posts.

SafariScreenSnapz002.png

Meanwhile, I took a much need break from the blog and completely ignored everything (except approving comments) and missed that TechCrunch linked to one of my pages. Causing a nice spike in traffic.