How Is AMREP Corporation Doing?

seekingalpha.com has a article about AMREP titled “Amrep’s Rio Rancho Dream May Turn Out To Be A Desert Mirage“. Everyone who lives in Rio Rancho should know about AMREP (especially if they live in one of their shitty houses). Overall the article indicates that the company’s media business is on the decline and it’s not well understood how much it’s real estate is worth.

It is currently a company that engages mainly in the business of subscription fulfillment services, newsstand distribution services and product packaging and fulfillment services as well as a bit of staffing businesses. We will call these businesses collectively as Media services and they make up pretty much all of the company’s business activities on a regular basis. The second aspect of the stock’s value is its large ownership of land in the city of Rio Rancho, New Mexico.

In the 1960s, AXR purchased the massive plot of land in Rio Rancho and it was mass marketed to people all over the world as a retirement home or an investment property. The 1960s ads marketed them as wonderful investments at a mere $10/month attracted investors worldwide and particularly from New York. AXR then sold thousands of plots to different investors without considering the future development possibilities of Rio Rancho. Thus, Rio Rancho is now left with the legacy of this antiquated platting method where any meaningful area for development has already been developed and most of the land left has been divided in ownership due to AXR’s own past plot sales.

Be sure to check out their website, which is as shitty as their houses.

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More Non News On The Village At Rio Rancho

Village at Rio Rancho

I’m still waiting for The Village at Rio Rancho to open. According to the Albuquerque Journal “Unser corridor attracting more business, development“, the area is growing with business. But its not clear what is going on with The Village.

The Village at Rio Rancho, proposed for 65 acres across the street from Rust, remains preliminary, according to Geisel.

“We are excited that the developer is starting to make plans for the next steps in the project,” he added.

New Mexico Has No Jobs

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From the Wall Street Journal “New Mexico Looks to Diversify Employer Mix

Bordered by states with rapidly expanding economies, New Mexico remains unable to improve much on an anemic recovery and officials trace it to one root cause: an overreliance on government jobs.

New Mexico posted nonfarm job growth of 0.2% from October 2012 to October 2013, compared with 2.4% in Texas, 1.9% in Colorado, and 1.7% in Arizona, according to a December report by the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions. New Mexico is still down about 40,000 nonfarm jobs compared with late 2007.

The article goes on to give some examples on how the state government is trying to bring in business such as tax cuts. It seems to be too little too late and I’m afraid the worse is to come for New Mexico.

What's Going On At The Arizona Intel Site?

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The Oregonian speculates “Intel activity slows in Arizona amid slack demand“.

The company has slowed the installation of production tools at its nearly complete, $5 billion Fab 42 near Phoenix (a fab is the industry’s term for a chip factory), according to Intel suppliers and contractors in Oregon.

These personnel, who asked not to be identified because of their relationship with Intel, say some tools appear to be idle in Arizona. Other tools have been redirected to the new D1X research fab in Hillsboro, which opens its first, $3 billion phase late this year.

When Intel announced plans to build Fab 42 two years ago, it said the Arizona facility would be complete in 2013. That’s still the timeline, according to corporate spokesman Chuck Mulloy — but he wouldn’t say when the facility will begin making high volumes of chips.

Los Alamos Lab's Roadrunner Supercomputer To Be Shut Down

The fastest supercomputer in the world in 2009 will be shutdown today, according to the Los Alamos National Labs.

8599713655_c725fb6f3d_bRoadrunner, the first supercomputer to break the once-elusive petaflop barrier—one million billion calculations per second—will be decommissioned on Sunday, March 31.

Roadrunner’s design was unique, and controversial. It combined two different kinds of processors, making it a “hybrid.” It had 6,563 dual-core general-purpose processors (AMD Opterons™), with each core linked to a special graphics processor (PowerXCell 8i) called a “Cell.” The Cell was an enhanced version of a specialized processor originally designed for the Sony Playstation 3®, adapted specifically to support scientific computing.

Future supercomputers will need to improve on Roadrunner’s energy efficiency to make the power bill affordable. Future supercomputers will also need new solutions for handling and storing the vast amounts of data involved in such massive calculations.

Extracting Gas From Air

A article on azcentral.com titled “Air Products grows to keep up with Intel” explains how Air Products makes air products and ships them to the Intel site in Arizona. This is probably similar to how it’s done for Intel in Rio Rancho, NM.

The company removes all components of air except nitrogen, oxygen and argon. Then in those white, angular towers, it separates out those three gases with very low temperatures. Oxygen turns to liquid at minus 297.3 degrees Fahrenheit, and nitrogen turns to liquid at minus 320 degrees.

Then the liquid is boiled, producing pure gas.

“We use compression and expansion, like the air-conditioning unit on the outside of a house,” Jordan explained.

Nitrogen gas made in Chandler goes directly into the pipeline, a structure intended to last 100 years.

Your Tax Dollars At Work: Laser Guided Bullets

Sandia labs Laser Guided Bullett
Sandia labs Laser Guided Bullett
The four-inch-long bullet has actuators that steer tiny fins that guide it to its target. Photo by Randy Montoya from Sandia Labs

Sandia Labs scientists had developed laser guided bullets. Really they are mini guided missals.

Sandia’s design for the four-inch-long bullet includes an optical sensor in the nose to detect a laser beam on a target. The sensor sends information to guidance and control electronics that use an algorithm in an eight-bit central processing unit to command electromagnetic actuators. These actuators steer tiny fins that guide the bullet to the target.