Closing The Intel Rio Rancho Site Looks More Likely Ever Day

In the March 25th issue of the Albuquerque Free Press (It’s a PDF download, not a online article) they suggest Intel will leave NM after 2015.

The poor relationship between intel management and state government doesn’t help things. I found this part particularly interesting.

Daymon Ely, a former Sandoval County Commis- sion chairman, said that Intel officials gave him the impression that they never really liked New Mexico.
“For whatever reason, their employees did not like coming to New Mexico. It was not a desirable place because it didn’t have a lot of the big-city stuff like Phoenix had, or places in California,” Ely said.
That was made clear, Ely said, when Intel officials flatly told him they weren’t interested in exploring other sites in Rio Rancho to quell the criticisms com- ing from Corrales. The Chandler plant, which opened the same year as the Rio Rancho facility, has faced nothing like the criticism Intel endured here, several economic-development officials told ABQ Free Press.
And then there are simply the intangibles, the signs of dysfunction that builds as a relationship goes sour.
Tommy Hughes, a former Sandoval County bond attorney who negotiated industrial revenue bond deals between the county and Intel, just doesn’t like Intel executives.
“When somebody from Intel’s mouth is moving, they are usually lying,” Hughes said. He cited negotiations in 1995 when Intel said it would provide Rio Rancho with a high school.

Overal Intel as a company is not doing well (the Oregonian Intel trims manufacturing group with buyouts amid technological and business transformation). While I didn’t initially think Intel would actually close the Rio Rancho site, I now think it’s only a matter of time.

I haven’t worked there in over a year now. I don’t miss it. I have many friends still working there and they say that the working conditions are bad and moral is at a all time low. 

Fab11x is still producing product, just older product on older equipment. With the layoffs and voluntary separation packages the size of the workforce continues to shrink and everyone is having to do more work with less.